City News

Press Releases and Announcements

City asks for public input on American Rescue Plan Act spending

Survey asks, “How would you spend $77 million on your city?”

The City of Richmond’s most recent engagement opportunity asks, “How would you spend $77 million on your city?” to help inform the city’s COVID-19 recovery spending plan, made possible by money from the federal government.

The American Rescue Plan Act, a law passed by the United States Congress, allocates $154 million in federal relief funding to the City of Richmond. The city will receive it in two payments of $77 million, a year apart.

This survey asks how Richmonders would like to see the first payment spent on their city. It will be open through August 9 at 11:59 p.m.

The survey is the first stage of community engagement around the American Rescue Plan funding. The results of this survey will assist the administration in creating the draft spending plan, which will then be available for public review and comment.

“This is a transformative investment,” said Mayor Stoney. “The American Rescue Plan Act has given us the chance to recover the right way. We need your input to make it happen.”

Important Details:

According to federal guidelines, the money can be spent on four key priorities: responding to the negative public health and economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, providing premium pay to essential workers, investing in water, sewer or broadband infrastructure and making up for revenue the city lost during the pandemic.

The money can be spent through 2026.

Richmond Public Schools has also received funding from the federal government. The School Board is responsible for allocating that money.

Richmond City Council ultimately has the authority to allocate the city’s federal funds.

To learn more about how the American Rescue Plan Act will impact Richmond and view ongoing engagement and education opportunities, residents are encouraged to visit RVA.gov: https://www.rva.gov/arp


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City Council Approves Resort Casino Host Community Agreement

Media Advisory
Tuesday, July 27, 2021
Contact: Devin Wood
Cell: 804-484-4800

Devin.Wood@richmondgov.com

 

Richmond, VA — Richmond City Council has approved the Host Community Agreement for ONE Casino + Resort (RVA Entertainment Holdings, LLC).  With this approval and the required approval from the Virginia Lottery in hand, the city will proceed with petitioning the Circuit Court for a November 2nd referendum on casino gaming in the City of Richmond.

“I congratulate the City Council for approving a resort casino Host Community Agreement that puts Richmonders first,” said Mayor Levar Stoney. 

The action paves the way for city voters to have the final say at the ballot box to move this project forward in South Richmond. If approved, ONE Casino + Resort will create over 1,300 good paying jobs with benefits and generate an estimated $172 million in new General Fund revenue over the five years of the project. 

“Richmond needs both,” said the mayor.  “Great new jobs for our residents and new revenue to help fund our priorities and keep taxes low for everyone.”

If the referendum is approved by Richmond voters, the $562 million project is planned to open in October 2024.

Information on the project and the text of the final Host Community Agreement can be found athttps://www.rva.gov/economic-development/resort-casino.

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City to Hold 2nd Virtual Public Engagement for Newly Proposed Bike Lanes

~ Online survey available July 25 – August 11 ~

RICHMOND, Va. – The Department of Public Works (DPW) has identified six corridors that present opportunities for enhanced bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure to be completed as part of the City’s paving and resurfacing program for summer 2021 through summer 2022. City residents will have an opportunity to review the proposed detailed design and provide feedback for bike lanes designated along six corridors throughout the city. The six corridors under consideration are:  

  • Brookland Parkway  
  • Colorado Avenue
  • Grove Avenue
  • Marshall Street
  • Walmsley Boulevard
  • Warwick Road

To review the project materials and comment on the detailed design for each corridor, which will help finalize the design before moving forward with construction, please go to: https://www.rva.gov/public-works/pedestrian-bicycling-and-trails and complete the survey. The survey will be online from Sunday, July 25 through Wednesday, August 11.

These bike lane projects will enhance our transportation infrastructure and improve safety for all roadway users. They are an important part of the City’s commitment to Vision Zero and support the Better Streets multimodal approach by implementing safety improvements such as high-visibility crosswalks for people who walk, accessible curb ramps for people who roll, and dedicated space for people to bike or scoot.

For more project details or if you need assistance with alternative means to review and comment, contact Emily Dalphy at 804-646-0346 or Emily.Dalphy@rva.gov

For more information on Public Works, please visit us online at https://www.rva.gov/public-works or email us at AskPublicWorks@RichmondGov.com

We’re Social! For updates on DPW-related projects, activities and events visit us on Twitter @DPW_RichmondVA

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The City of Richmond Department of Public Works (DPW) is one of only 178 currently accredited public works agencies in the United States. DPW’s portfolio comprises a wide array of services to include leaf collection; street, sidewalk and alley maintenance; trash collection; recycling; grass cutting;  graffiti removal; parking enforcement; urban forestry; street signs; traffic signals and pavement markings and civil engineering. In addition, DPW maintains upkeep on most city buildings; issues permits for working in the city’s right-of-way; manages the RVA Bike Share program and maintains the fleet of city vehicles. DPW’s operating budget comes from the general fund of the City of Richmond.  For more information about DPW services, click here or call 3-1-1.

Shockoe Small Area Plan available for public input

Residents are encouraged to provide feedback before August 27

The draft small area plan for the Shockoe area of Richmond is now available for public comment through August 27. The community-rooted plan envisions the redevelopment of Shockoe with an emphasis on reparative investment and historical justice.

The proposed Heritage Campus, dedicated to telling the complete history of the neighborhood, will serve as a catalyst for equitable growth.

Over the past year, the Office of DCAO Sharon Ebert and the Department of Planning and Development Review (PDR) have collaborated with the Shockoe Alliance and the community to develop the draft plan through monthly meetings, public workshops, surveys and focus group interviews. Now, residents can share their thoughts on the draft in a number of ways:

  • Visit https://www.rva.gov/planning-development-review/shockoe-small-area-plan to read the plan and provide your thoughts on an interactive document.
  • Attend an in person meeting hosted by PDR and Councilwoman Newbille on August 3 at 6:30 p.m. on the lower level of Main Street Station to listen to a presentation on the draft plan, ask questions, and provide your input.
  • Attend a virtual meeting hosted by PDR on August 4 at 12 p.m. to listen to a presentation on the draft plan, ask questions, and provide your input. The meeting link will be posted here.
  • Invite PDR staff to a meeting of your interested group or organization to share more about the draft plan. Please email kimberly.chen@rva.gov or call (804) 646-6364 to request a meeting.

“The Shockoe Small Area Plan considers the neighborhood’s and our city’s tumultuous history, proposing an intentional vision for sustainable growth,” said Mayor Levar Stoney. “I encourage every Richmond resident to give the draft plan a look and let us know what you think.”

Where is Shockoe?

Shockoe generally includes the area from the James River to E. Leigh Street and from 14th to 25th Streets to the east of the Central Business District. It encompasses the oldest portion of the City of Richmond, laid out in 1737 by Major William Mayo, and portions of the Shaccoe Plantation, controlled by members of the Byrd family since 1659.

In the mid-nineteenth century, Shockoe was the second largest market in enslaved Africans in the United States, second only to New Orleans. The area served as the commercial, industrial, religious, governmental, and residential center of the city for over 100 years. In the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, industrial and commercial enterprises burgeoned in Shockoe, resulting in the displacement of residences, churches, and schools.

The city addressed frequent flooding in Shockoe by burying Shockoe Creek in the 1920s and constructing the flood wall along the James River in the 1990s. In 1958, another swath was carved through the area with the construction of Interstate 95. In recent years, Shockoe has grown as a multi-family residential area and entertainment district. Many of the old factories have been converted to apartments, and commercial buildings have been adapted for use as restaurants and clubs.

Recent planning efforts in Shockoe

In 2018, Richmond was one of four cities selected for a yearlong program of professional development, leadership training and assistance with a local land use challenge known as the Rose Fellowship. The fellowship asked, “How can Richmond leverage the assets and investments in Shockoe Bottom to create a destination that protects its cultural and historic heritage, encourages economic development and is sustainable?” The panel of experts recommended a plan be created for Shockoe through an open public process focused on the reconciliation of Richmond’s past and present and not limited to a singular project.

Out of this recommendation came the creation of the Shockoe Alliance in 2019 to guide and facilitate the planning process and Mayor Stoney’s commitment in 2020 to the development of the Heritage Campus. In 2019, three public visioning sessions were held with over 570 participants. The Alliance worked diligently through the pandemic to guide the creation of this draft plan.

The Shockoe Small Area Plan outlines strategies for recognizing and commemorating Shockoe’s complex and difficult history through the development of the Heritage Campus. The Campus will serve as a major catalyst for economic development in the area. The plan also calls for development of vacant and underutilized parcels, the strengthening of links between other areas of the city and the regions, and the creation of equitable housing and business opportunities.

What’s next?

After this engagement period, staff will review the comments received, amend the plan, and then present the amended Shockoe Small Area Plan to City Planning Commission and City Council to be incorporated as a part of Richmond 300: A Guide for Growth, the City’s new Master Plan. Please contact Kimberly Chen at kimberly.chen@rva.gov or 804-646-6364 with any questions.

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Time to Renew Parking Permits in the Randolph and Mulberry Districts - Current permits expire July 31

 

RICHMOND, Va. – New parking decals for residents of the Randolph and Mulberry Restricted Parking Districts are now on sale. Residents can get more information, verify residency in their Parking Districts and download an application for mailing on the City’s website: https://www.rva.gov/public-works/parking-enterprise. Both mail-in and in-person renewal options are available for qualifying residents. The current parking permit expires July 31, 2021.

Residents must display the permit on their cars to park for more than the designed time restriction. A resident is either the residing owner of record or renter of property located within the Restricted Parking District. A City of Richmond Residential Parking Permit Application must be completed and approved prior to decal issuance. The Department of Public Works verifies residency for both homeowners residing at the property and lease agreements for renters.

A resident of the district is defined as an owner of record or renter of property in the district and members of their immediate family who reside with the owner or renter at the address in the District:

(1) Who are licensed drivers, and

(2) Whose domicile is the address for which they are seeking to obtain the parking permit

Decals and applications are also available at City Hall, Room 102, 900 East Broad Street, Richmond, Virginia. The office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please call 804-646-5700 if you have any questions.

For more information on Public Works, please visit us online at https://www.rva.gov/public-works or email us at AskPublicWorks@RichmondGov.com

We’re Social! For updates on DPW-related projects, activities and events visit us on Twitter @DPW_RichmondVA

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The City of Richmond Department of Public Works (DPW) is one of only 178 currently accredited public works agencies in the United States. DPW’s portfolio comprises a wide array of services to include leaf collection; street, sidewalk and alley maintenance; trash collection; recycling; grass cutting;  graffiti removal; parking enforcement; urban forestry; street signs; traffic signals and pavement markings and civil engineering. In addition, DPW maintains upkeep on most city buildings; issues permits for working in the city’s right-of-way; manages the RVA Bike Share program and maintains the fleet of city vehicles. DPW’s operating budget comes from the general fund of the City of Richmond.  For more information about DPW services, click here or call 3-1-1.

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